Drifting Interstellar Worlds Could be the Seeds of New Planets

Interstellar objects the size of skyscrapers such as ʻOumuamua, discovered two years ago, could help new star systems to quickly form planets. This is the result of a recent study by the Jülich Supercomputing Centre together with Queen’s University Belfast. Myriads of such asteroids are likely drifting through our Milky Way.

High-Tech Material in a Salt Crust

MAX phases are viewed as promising materials for the future. A new method developed by scientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich now makes it possible to produce this desirable material class on an industrial scale for the first time: a crust of salt protects the raw material from oxidation at a production temperature of more than 1,000 degrees Celsius.

Yes, it does matter

An international team of neuroscientists have been reviewing the evidence on gender bias in their field. Their findings—together with proposed solutions on various levels—are now published in the European Journal of Neuroscience. In support of these findings, the paper has been signed by a number of leading neuroscientists.

New Map of the Sky Published

An international team of more than 200 astronomers from 18 countries has published the first maps produced by a radio sky survey with previously unprecedented sensitivity using the “Low Frequency Array” radio telescope (LOFAR). The map reveals hundreds of thousands of unknown galaxies and sheds new light on research fields such as black holes, interstellar magnetic fields, and galaxy clusters.

Forschungszentrum Jülich’s Nitrogen Oxide Plotter

Scientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich have now developed a nitrogen oxide plotter that allows you to quickly and easily find out the nitrogen oxide levels at all German measurement stations over time. The online tool is freely accessible.

There's more!

Once all the peppers have been picked, the last leg of the leaves’ and stems’ journey takes them to the compost heap. Researchers from Jülich, Aachen and Bonn don’t think that this needs to be the case. They are investigating whether valuable substances can be extracted from the unused plant leftovers for use in medicine, cosmetics and the food industry.

Blätterfunktion

Brain Scan for Individual Prognosis

Prof. Simon Eickhoff evaluates MRI and fMRI brain scans of often hundreds of people in a very special way: his team trains computers to read activity patterns in functional networks of the brain from the image data. He hopes that this information will make it possible to predict the further course of developments for individual patients affected by depression, schizophrenia or Parkinson’s.