Theoretical Nanoelectronics

The quantum mechanical nature of matter is the basis of all functioning of electronic devices. We use techniques from many-body physics, from quantum statistical physics, and from the mathematics of topology, to analyze the properties of electrons in a wide range of present-day exploratory devices. Our work can enable the development of new qubits, and new approaches to building a quantum computer.

Head: Prof. Dr. David DiVincenzo

News and Events

Hofstadter's butterfly

Blueprint for fault-tolerant qubits

Building a universal quantum computer is a challenging task because of the fragility of quantum bits, or qubits for short. Researchers led by Prof. David DiVincenzo have now proposed a design for a circuit with passive error correction. Such a circuit would already be inherently fault protected and could significantly accelerate the construction of a quantum computer with a large number of qubits.

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PGI Colloquium: Prof. Dr. Chris Leighton, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA

Recently, incorporation of electrolytes (e.g., ionic liquids) into field-effect transistors has been shown to enable electric double layer transistors, which can induce large (1015 cm-2) carrier densities at surfaces. These correspond to substantial fractions of an electron or hole per unit cell in most materials, sufficient to electrically control electronic phase transitions.

Focus

ElectronicPropertiesOfNanostructuredMaterials

Electronic Properties of Nanostructured Materials

Atomic order-disorder transitions or phase transitions like freezing-melting are among the most dramatic effects occurring in condensed matter.

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Quantum Information Processing

We work at the fundamental level on the theory of quantum information processing, developing new concepts for qubits and multi-qubit modules.  We work closely with the experimental scientists in PGI-11.