High flyer

They are considered to be promising candidates for the solar modules of the future: materials with a perovskite structure. Prof. Michael Saliba has been heavily involved in this young field of research since its beginning. At Jülich, he is now pursuing a new idea.

Micrometre by Micrometre: Decoding the Human Brain with AI

The starting signal has been given: the German-Canadian Helmholtz International BigBrain Analytics and Learning Laboratory (HIBALL) takes up its work. The goal: a three-dimensional brain atlas at a cellular resolution level. The method: the close integration of artificial intelligence, supercomputing and neuroscience. Involved are: more than 40 scientists.

Seeing Opportunity in the Coronavirus Crisis

During the coronavirus crisis, scientists are often being asked to take part in interviews and discussions. Even complex topics related to virology and statistics have become popular. In this interview, Jülich expert Prof. Hans Peter Peters explains why this is the case. He addresses public opinion on science and technology.

Coronavirus and Air Quality in the Rhineland 

What impact is the shutdown prompted by the coronavirus pandemic having on air quality in the Rhineland region? Jülich’s Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Troposphere is seeking to answer this question with a measurement campaign, which is being launched at the beginning of May from the Bonn-Hangelar airfield. A Zeppelin NT airship will be used to measure trace gases and particulate matter over multiple flights on different routes.

Blätterfunktion

“Noisy” Chips: Insights from Brain Research Offer Benefits for Neuromorphic Hardware

Neuromorphic chips modelled on the human brain have enormous potential, offering a promising and efficient alternative for artificial intelligence (AI) tasks in particular. However, a number of questions have yet to be answered, not least because the mechanisms and principles that make the original model – our brain – so efficient remain unclear to this day. Scientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich together with their partners from the Human Brain Project have now shed light on an aspect of biological information processing that had previously remained a mystery.