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JURECA-DC

Supercomputer for Large Data Volumes

Forschungszentrum Jülich upgraded the modular supercomputer JURECA which is now capable of 23.5 quadrillion computations per second (petaflops). One particular focus of the new system is on processing gigantic volumes of data. This was achieved by installing the module JURECA-DC – “DC” stands for “data-centric” – delivered by the French vendor Atos and operated by the cluster software of the German company ParTec.

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Dr. Silvia De Rubeis

Award-Winning Autism Researcher Visits Jülich

This summer, the Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM) will play host to Dr. Silvia De Rubeis from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York, who has received the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, together with € 45,000 in prize money, for her research into autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

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Kabelstränge OpenSuperQ

How Quantum Systems Keep a Memory of Their Environment

Many quantum devices – electrical, optical or otherwise – respond in a delayed manner to a control pulse. The systems still show traces of past behaviour. Researchers at RWTH Aachen University and Forschungszentrum Jülich have now shown how this "memory" can be modelled more easily. The results are relevant, among other things, for applications in quantum technology, the development of which is still a challenge due to difficulties in modelling.

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Quantenpunkt-Kontaktstruktur

Innovations for Quantum Computing with Topological Insulators

Forschungszentrum Jülich and the University of Würzburg will together investigate the quantum phenomena of topological materials and the opportunities they present within quantum computing. The Free State of Bavaria is funding the project to the tune of € 13 million.

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Rotunde

Arm and Forschungszentrum Jülich sign multi-year collaboration agreement

Arm and the Forschungszentrum Jülich signed today a multi-year cooperation agreement. Its goal is to strengthen their joint effort in advancing the optimization of High Performance Computing (HPC) applications for Arm-based supercomputers. Chips with Arm architecture are found in virtually all smartphones and the vast majority of tablet computers.

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Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Ulf-G. Meißner vom Helmholtz-Institut für Strahlen- und Kernphysik der Universität Bonn erhält einen ERC Advanced Grant.

Ulf-G. Meißner Awarded an ERC Advanced Grant

What happens when strange quarks are inserted into atomic nuclei? What “habitable” universes are theoretically possible? Prof. Ulf-G. Meißner from the Institute for Advanced Simulation – Theory of the Strong Interactions (IAS-4) aims to find the answers to these and other questions through research.

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Fußgänger-Experiment

Detecting Alarm Signals for Critical Crowding Levels

Though densely packed crowds in stadiums, clubs, train stations, or pedestrian zones might currently seem like a scene from another world, they are in fact the subject of the European CrowdDNA project, in which Forschungszentrum Jülich is involved. The researchers want to use the latest in sensor technology to determine easily measurable characteristics that can be used to accurately predict the behaviour of crowds and the dangers that this behaviour poses.

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Supercomputer JURECA

Concentrated computing power against SARS-CoV-2

The first vaccines authorised for use are raising hopes for an end to the pandemic. What is still missing, however, is an effective cure. In the European joint project EXSCALATE4CORONAVIRUS (E4C), scientists are searching for molecules that block central proteins of the coronavirus. In a recent publication – which resulted from an academic collaboration of scientists consisting of E4C, the “Human Brain Project” and other European research institutions – the team headed by Prof. Giulia Rossetti from Jülich reports a method to predict more precisely which molecules inhibit “Mpro”, the main protease of SARS-CoV-2.

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Hofstadter's butterfly

Blueprint for fault-tolerant qubits

Building a universal quantum computer is a challenging task because of the fragility of quantum bits, or qubits for short. Researchers led by Prof. David DiVincenzo have now proposed a design for a circuit with passive error correction. Such a circuit would already be inherently fault protected and could significantly accelerate the construction of a quantum computer with a large number of qubits.

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Künstlerische Darstellung der atomaren Spitze eines Rastertunnelmikroskops beim Abtasten einer Metalloberfläche mit einem aufgelagerten Kobaltatom.

Researchers Question Fundamental Study on the Kondo Effect

Jülich, 7 January 2021 - The Kondo effect influences the electrical resistance of metals at low temperatures and generates complex electronic and magnetic orders. Novel concepts for data storage and processing, such as using quantum dots, are based on this. In 1998, researchers from the United States published spectroscopic studies on the Kondo effect using scanning tunnelling microscopy, which are considered ground-breaking and have triggered countless others of a similar kind. Many of these studies may have to be re-examined now that Jülich researchers have shown that the Kondo effect cannot be proven beyond doubt by this method. Instead, another phenomenon is creating precisely the spectroscopic “fingerprint” that was previously attributed to the Kondo effect.

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Quantencomputer

Liberating Quantum Processors from Parasitic Interactions

Creating perfect entanglement – a basic prerequisite for the success of quantum computers – requires full control over all qubit-qubit interactions. Until now, this goal has been hindered by the presence of an always-on and fundamental parasitic interaction that disturbs entanglement. Now, researchers at Forschungszentrum Jülich and RWTH Aachen University in collaboration with IBM T.J. Watson Research Center and Syracuse University both in the USA, have developed a theory-motivated idea and successfully implemented it to eliminate these interactions between two qubits. Their work results in a better understanding of the physics behind the error which also allows more precise entanglement to be engineered, as well as the unentanglement of two qubits.

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Supercomputer Made in Jülich Setting New Benchmarks

Forschungszentrum Jülich’s upgraded supercomputer JUWELS is now capable of 85 petaflops. This is equivalent to 85 quadrillion computing operations per second or the computing power of more than 300,000 modern PCs. Thanks to its new booster module, JUWELS is able to massively expand the application limits of simulations and also offers the strongest platform in Europe for the use of artificial intelligence (AI).

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