Quantum Information Processing (QIP)

About

Quantum computing has become one of the most promising technologies to solve problems in quantum simulations for materials and chemicals, optimization and machine learning. Those solutions will contribute to a sustainably growing society. Applications such as vehicle routing, power trading, supply chain network optimization, cancer radiation treatment scheduling, and target interactions for drug design constitute current optimization challenges. Computing methods like machine learning and data mining, as well as creating artificial intelligence and computer vision are also rooted in the field of optimization. The research group Quantum Information Processing (QIP) works on benchmarking state-of-the-art quantum computers, simulating quantum systems and developing prototype applications and use cases for quantum computing.

QIP performs benchmarking by implementing optimization algorithms such as the Quantum Approximation Optimization Algorithm (QAQA) and the Variational Quantum Eigensolver (VQE) on various gate-based noisy-intermediate-state-quantum (NISQ) devices. Their performances are cross-platform validated and compared to results generated by emulators of ideal quantum computers such as the Jülich Universal Quantum Computer Simulator (JUQCS). Additionally, analog quantum computers, such as quantum annealers and quantum simulators, are included in the cross-platform benchmarking process. QIP works on integrating various quantum devices into the Modular Supercomputer Architecture of the Jülich Supercomputing Centre to enable hybrid classical-quantum calculations, which are essential for practical quantum computing. Based on these benchmarking and integration efforts, the group seeks to identify and develop use cases and prototype applications that will help to solve large-scale problems in the near future. Besides algorithmic benchmarking, QIP simulates quantum systems, such as multi-qubit chips, to understand error sources and their affection on algorithm execution.

Research Topics

Quantum computation

Simulation of quantum systems

Benchmarking of quantum devices using QAOA, QUBO and VQE

Development of use cases and prototype applications

Integration of quantum computers into HPC environments

Event-by-event simulation of (quantum) optics experiments

Support and development of the Jülich Unified Infrastructure for Quantum computing (JUNIQ)

Contact

Prof. Dr. Kristel Michielsen

JSC

Building 16.3 / Room 340

+49 2461/61-2524

E-Mail

Research topics

Quantum Computation

Advances in quantum information processing have opened new avenues for using quantum phenomena to perform computation. Quantum computers have become of great interest, primarily due to their potential of solving certain computationally hard problems such as factoring integers and searching databases.

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Event-by-event simulation of (quantum) optics experiments

Recent advances in nanotechnology are paving the way to attain control over individual microscopic objects. The ability to prepare, manipulate, couple and measure single microscopic systems facilitate the study of single quantum systems at the level of individual events. Such experiments address the most fundamental aspects of quantum theory.

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Simulation of quantum systems

Some fundamental questions in statistical mechanics such as under which conditions a system coupled to a reservoir equilibrates and how the canonical distribution emerges from the interaction between the system and the reservoir, have only been partially resolved. Roughly and more generally speaking one could say that the main unresolved question is how the basic equations of physics, which are all deterministic and time-reversible, can give rise to the time-irreversible (thermodynamic) phenomena that we observe.

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Technology Readiness Levels of Quantum Computing Technology

Quantum Technology Readiness Levels describe the maturity of Quantum Computing Technology.

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Advances in quantum information processing have opened new avenues for using quantum phenomena to perform computation. Quantum computers have become of great interest, primarily due to their potential of solving certain computationally hard problems such as factoring integers and searching databases.

More

Members

Last Modified: 28.07.2022