Making an Effective Contribution to Structural Change

With its more than 6,000 employees, Forschungszentrum Jülich intends to contribute its scientific excellence and expertise to achieve successful structural change in the Rhineland. Together with its partners at the German Federal Government and the state government of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW), Forschungszentrum Jülich has therefore submitted a number of specific projects for consideration; these have now been included in the concrete proposals adopted by the Commission on Growth, Structural Change and Employment for implementing structural policy recommendations.

From Lignite to the Bioeconomy

What does the renunciation of fossil resources mean for a region whose identity has traditionally been strongly linked to lignite? Interview with plant researcher Prof. Ulrich Schurr on the role that the bioeconomy could play in structural change.

Coincidence Helps Expand Cornerstone of Physics

Atomic nuclei and electrons in solids influence each other’s motion – and they do so not only in rare exceptional cases, as previously believed. The discovery was made by Scientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich and Technische Universität München. The effect could be useful for data processing or for lossless transmission of electric current.

Five Facts About City Air

Germany has been discussing this for quite some time. But the debate about nitrogen oxides is complicated. Here, Dr. Franz Rohrer and his colleagues from IEK-8 can help. They investigate how emissions from transport affect air quality. We have compiled five exciting facts and findings.

Drifting Interstellar Worlds Could be the Seeds of New Planets

Interstellar objects the size of skyscrapers such as ʻOumuamua, discovered two years ago, could help new star systems to quickly form planets. This is the result of a recent study by the Jülich Supercomputing Centre together with Queen’s University Belfast. Myriads of such asteroids are likely drifting through our Milky Way.

Blätterfunktion

Statement by Prof. Katrin Amunts on the use of the molecular genetic scissors CRISPR/Cas9 in two girls

According to the researcher Jiankui He from Shenzhen University in China, the first humans to have been genetically manipulated using the CRISPR/Cas9 molecular genetic scissors were born in November. In two girls, a gene for a receptor of the immune system was purposefully removed in the embryonic stage in order to make them resistant to HIV infections. They will also pass this change on to their descendants.